Monday, September 15, 2008

14th September - 18th Sunday after Pentecost - Proper 19

This time around there are four lists.

Service #1: I cantored the Mass at Immaculate Conception yesterday. As usual, the numbers come out of GIA's Gather Comprehensive 1994 (green cover):

Sunday 7.45 am Mass: Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Gloria: 176 (Andrews)
Gospel Acclamation: 257, Alleluia 7 (Berthier). I fit the following verse to the tone indicated, minus Alleluia: "We adore Thee O Christ and we praise Thee; because by Thy Holy Cross, Thou hast redeemed the world."
Sanctus, Mem. Accl., Amen, Agnus Dei: Mass of Light, with my "doctoring" of the Agnus Dei, essentially undoing the language faux-pas Haas inflicted upon it in the first place ...

Prelude: one of the pieces from 24 Pièces en Style Libre (Vierne). Wish I knew which one ...
Pro: 791, Lift High the Cross (CRUCIFER)
Psalm: Psalm 78 (Guimont)
Off: 698, Take up your cross (O WALY WALY)
Comm: The royal banners forward go (VEXILLA REGIS PRODEUNT, Mode 1)
Re: 488, To Jesus Christ, our sovereign king (ICH GLAUB AN GOTT)
Postlude: Improvisation on Vexilla Regis prodeunt

The pastor, Fr. Dan, delivered as usual, a very insightful homily. What I found interesting was a different way of thinking of the much-maligned snake. He made the comparison between the snake (having molted its skin ...) and Jesus Christ (after Resurrection). I'll write a separate post on this topic.

It was my idea to do the Communion hymn. (Usually, the organist plays a voluntary during that time.) It's not in Gather, as far as I know, so I chanted it solo. After the Mass, I received so many compliments from people. Many asked me what that lovely piece was that I chanted, and after I told them, they gushed on at how beautiful it was, and they'd love to hear more of that in the future. Even the organist told me that whenever my turn at cantoring comes up, I should feel free to bring any plainsong pieces I want to do during Communion.

Service #2: St. Joseph's Episcopal Church where I played my usual 10.30 am service. I will admit to being disappointed that we're not observing Exaltation of the Holy Cross. According to the Episcopal Church, it's one of those feasts that do not take precedence on a Sunday. Actually, I was curious enough to look this over with a couple of friends in the Book of Common Prayer, and they have seven principal feasts, including Easter, Ascension, Pentecost, Trinity Sunday, All Saints', Christmas, and Epiphany. Three feasts would take precedence on a Sunday: Holy Name (which I believe is New Year's Day), Presentation (Feb. 2, also known as Candlemas), and Transfiguration, which for the Episcopals tend to come on the last Sunday after Epiphany. So I suppose, given that, Holy Cross would not take precedence on a Sunday. Knowing this doesn't take away my disappointment at having the feast moved to Monday, however.

Enough of that. As usual, numbers are out of The Hymnal 1982.

The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Holy Eucharist: Rite II
Prelude: The royal banners forward go (VEXILLA REGIS PRODEUNT); Composition on a Plainsong (John Dunstable)
Pro: 494, Crown him with many crowns (DIADEMATA)
Song of Praise: S-236 (Benedictus es, Domine; J. Rutter)
Psalm: Psalm 114 (Ford; Plainsong Mode 2)
Seq: 60, Creator of the stars of night (CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM)
Off: Gather Comprehensive 726, Make me a channel of your peace (Temple)
Sanctus: S-125, Community Mass (Proulx)
Lord's Prayer: chanted (S-119 in Hymnal 1982)
Fraction Anthem: S-167, The disciples knew the Lord Jesus (M. Martens; Mode 6)
Comm: 648, When Israel was in Egypt's land (GO DOWN, MOSES)
Re: 690, Guide me, O thou great Jehovah (CWM RHONDDA)
Postlude: Agincourt Hymn (Dunstable)

I had an interesting conversation with a couple of people after the service. One really nice fellow from England was telling me about how, at a ... was it a football or a rugby match? ... well, there would be the Welsh, singing the Cwm Rhondda theme; I believe he said it was their National Anthem, and whilst singing, they would have tears running down their cheeks.

Another interesting conversation: if a parish is named "Holy Cross" or "Church of the Resurrection", "Church of the Nativity", "Church of the Most Precious Blood" then who or what would their patron be? It is obvious for churches like "St. Joseph", "St. Raphael the Archangel", "St. Bede", even "Immaculate Conception". Would the patron be Jesus Christ? His cross? His blood? (Your comments welcome in the combox.)

Service #3: Episcopal Centre at Duke University.

The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Holy Eucharist: Rite II
Prelude: The royal banners forward go (VEXILLA REGIS PRODEUNT); Composition on a Plainsong (John Dunstable)
Pro: 494, Crown him with many crowns (DIADEMATA)
Gloria: S-280 (Powell)
Psalm: Ps 114, recited
Seq: 60, Creator of the stars of night (CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM)
Off: 648, When Israel was in Egypt's land (GO DOWN, MOSES)
Sanctus: S-125, Community Mass (Proulx)
Communion Hymn: WLP 831, Ubi Caritas (Taizé)
Re: 690, Guide me, O thou great Jehovah (CWM RHONDDA)
Postlude: Agincourt Hymn (Dunstable)

Compline at Chapel of the Cross.

We've been using the Order for Compline, as set by David Hurd.

Here are our little additions:

Let my prayer come up into Thy presence (Henry Purcell)
Psalms 4 and 134 (chanted to Tone 8)
Hymn: Christ, mighty Saviour (CHRISTE, LUX MUNDI, plainsong Mode 7)
In manus tuas (Sheppard; sung in addition to "Into your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit ...)
Nunc Dimittis with Faux-bourdons (H. Willan)
Salve Regina (Marian antiphon right after the Dismissal)
Ave Maria (Robert Parsons)
Organ Voluntary by the abfab David Arcus.

1 comment:

Perm said...

Well, to answer (in small part):

As my parish is The Church of the Holy Cross, the Feast of the Holy Cross (Sept.14, or the Sunday closest to it) is our Feast (Patronal/Namesake) day. So, yesterday we used the Eucharistic Propers for Holy Cross Day (Isaiah 45, Psalm 98, Phil.2, and John 12) in lieu of Pentecost 18.

If a parish is called Transfiguration, their patronal day would either be Epiphany Last OR 6 August, depending on the observation of that parish (we love the Transfiguration so much that it occurs in the Kalendar *twice*.)

So, a parish's "patron" can be a Feast Day just as easily as a Saint -- in which case, yes, Our Lord would be considered the patron.